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Rehab helps Tyrone strike gold at games!

Specialist support at West Midlands Rehabilitation Centre has helped a young athlete fulfil his dream of winning gold in his first major international athletics competition.

Twenty-three-year-old Tyrone Williams clinched gold for javelin and silver for shot put in his event classification at the 2015 World Cerebral Palsy Games in Nottingham.

Tyrone had received orthotics support at the centre for six years. He received additional targeted physiotherapy to work on his core stability, strength and balance in preparation for the Games.

Tyrone was born with a number of complex conditions which require ongoing healthcare support, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy and a learning disability.  Aged 16, his talent for athletics was spotted at an after-school sports club.

Tyrone Williams prepares to throw the discus
Specialist physiotherapist Siân Randerson worked with Tyrone on his core strength and stability in the run-up to the Games, helping to improve his balance.

“The sports coach at Victoria School in Northfield turned to me one day and said: ‘did you know Tyrone could throw?’,” remembers proud mum Yvonne.

“I didn’t really know what he meant until I saw him in action!

“On his advice, I got Tyrone a coach. When he started competing in athletics, he knew it was something he wanted to do.”

At 19, Tyrone joined top athletics club Birchfield Harriers and the journey began to representing his country.

“I couldn’t wait to compete and was very proud to be selected for Team England,” he says.

“I even had a specially made blue splint with the Three Lions on it!”

Tyrone’s cerebral palsy causes weakness and impaired function in his right arm and leg. To help him walk, he wears specially-designed splints to help with everyday mobility and provide enough flexibility to enable him to run and throw.

Specialist physiotherapist Siân Randerson worked with Tyrone on his core strength and stability in the run-up to the Games, helping to improve his balance.

“When Tyrone came to see me, he couldn’t stand on one leg,” says Siân. “Now, with the help of a targeted exercise  programme which he has been doing at home and in training, he can balance on one leg for three seconds.

“This is just an example of the great progress Tyrone has made in such a short time, which is a credit to the focus and discipline he has.”

Tyrone’s training continues twice a week at Birchfield Harriers’ Alexander Stadium as he looks forward to his new goal – medals at the 2020 Paralympics in Tokyo.

Tyrone proudly wears his gold medal.